Sir Grays The Gaul
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Sir Grays, like the last three generations of Pont Farcy, was born and raised in the town of Coutances under the protection of Duke Manche. Though hereditary, the post of Pont Farcy was strictly a military office responsible for defending the only pass through the rough hills of midland Manche. The duke retained the Font Parcy family as household knights and the lord of Font Parcy was ever stationed at his post.

When Grays was a small child of 2 years his father perished of pneumonia in the desolate outpost. Thus Duke Manche was forever the father figure and benefactor of Sir Grays. Grays had a natural inclination toward birds and bird keeping. At the age of 12 his skills were so highly regarded that Duke Manche appointed him falconer of the ducal mews. It was also at this time that his sister, Vivienne, became pregnant with Duke Manche's bastard son.

When Grays turned 15 he was made squire to Duke Manche's nephew, Sir Iulius the Pious. Behind Sir Iulius Grays fought many a skirmish against the Franks who incessantly troubled the eastern border of Syagria. After reaching his majority Grays was stationed at Pont Farcy, replacing the warden watching over the remote tower while Grays grew into manhood. That same year he took a wife and his son, Garlys, was born.

It was but one year later that Frankish King Clovis descended like a raging fire on Soissons. Praetor Syagrius, defacto king of the now isolated Roman province of Gallias, barely escaped with his life. Duke Manche submitted to King Clovis and was treacherously murdered before Grays' eyes. The town of Coustances was overrun, resulting in the death of Garlys and Grays' wife Guellyl. Sir Grays swore vengeance on the Franks. Pretending submission and leaving stealthily, Sir Grays then began a campaign of brigandry and slaughter against whatever Franks he could easily accost. His predations along the northern coast lasted only a season before King Clovis ordered him hunted down.

Grays fled back to Manche and sought refuge with his cousin, Sir Percy. Percy could not turn out his brother and offered succor regardless of the consequences, knowing full well that if the Franks discovered Sir Grays whereabouts his land and family would be forfeit.

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